Black and White Catalogue

These Catalogue Pictures are being shown on the website for reference since many of our customers will already be familiar with them. Also the black and white catalogue has some interesting descriptions about various styles.

The images below are taken from a series of photographs arranged by Mr. Eric Lobb who joined the firm in 1939. Please note that these catalogue images are shown on this website for reference since many of our customers will already be familiar with them, also the black and white catalogue has some interesting descriptions about various styles.

Nowadays the setting may be considered old-fashioned but such elegant and classical beauty
seems to have a timelessness of its own, particularly in the context of the craftsmanship which we strive to maintain at the highest level.

We continue to make these styles and indeed many others besides and hope these pictures
will give you pleasure to look at and, if necessary, the opportunity to order afresh.

Plain Oxford

Plain Oxford

Made of waxed calf leather, this shoe is correct for any Town occasion; although Box Calf is now more used with equal effect if preferred. The smart line is enhanced by the beveled “waist” – the centre portion of the sole which joins the front with the heel-which is a feature of all light-weight shoes and contrasts with the square waist used for stouter types such as “Norwegian” or “Shooting” shoes; the punched holes in the toe-cap are sometimes replaced by two narrow rows of stitching.

Half Brogue Oxford

Half Brogue Oxford

A light-weight shoe for smart, but not strictly formal, Town wear. This particular style, which has been copied all over the World, was first created by JOHN LOBB some eighty years ago when shoes first began to take the place of boots. It was designed to meet the demand for a shoe less severe than the plain Oxford yet lighter in style and weight than a fully-brogued shoe. The shoe photographed is of Russia Calf Leather and is one of a pair made for the Paris Exhibition of 1937, at which the Firm was awarded the “Diplome d’honneur”. Willow or analine calf are used these days since Russia Calf is no longer made.

 

Brown and White

Brown and White

The contrast of colour and leather provides a gaity, smartness and elegance which combine to make this shoe an essential part of the wardrobe of the yachtsman or holiday-maker. Willow Calf and White Suede are used but the same style can be carried out effectively in black and white, using Box Calf or, more rarely, Patent leather. A half-brogue with a straight toe-cap is sometimes preferred to the wing cap shown in the photograph.

The three-piece tree completely fills the shoe, giving maximum support to all parts and thus assisting cleaning. The centre key-piece has no handle, as in our alternative three-piece tree, and is therefore easily packed for travelling. This solid tree is the one recommended above all others for preserving the shape and life of the shoe.

Evening Dress

Evening Dress

Too well known to require description, attention need only be drawn to the svelte lines which give the hand-made shoe a glove-like fitting. The neatness of sole and delicately bevelled waist are both elegant and practical in a dancing shoe. A similar shoe with the addition of a plain toe-cap is usually made for wearing with a Dinner Jacket and black tie. In frosty weather, Patent leather should be slightly warmed before wearing as this will help to preserve the fine lacquered surface.

The three-piece tree, completely filling the shoe, and giving maximum support to all parts, is strongly recommended for Patent leather and, indeed, for all shoes. A handle to the key-piece is not neccessary in this instance owing to the ease with which Patent can be cleaned. For travelling it is, moreover, exceptionally compact.

V Front

V Front

Designed primarily for weekend and light country wear, this shoe is now much used for informal occasions in Town. The long, plain front shows to great advantage in highly polished Brown Calf and Black Box Calf but Suedes of all shades are also frequently used.

To maintain the best appearance, trees should always be used, so that creases may be removed and the smooth polish of the front, which is such a feature of this shoe, be retained. Hollow-hinged tress are suggested are suggested for lightness and convenience when packing a weekend bag.

Buckskin Derby

Buckskin Derby

The popularity achieved by Buckskin and Reverse Calf for men’s shoes in recent years testifies to their practical comfort and good wearing qualities for sporting and similar occasions; in addition, the range of colours is sufficiently wide to satisfy most tastes The shoe photographed is designed for simplicity but these skins are equally effective for Derbys or Oxfords both plain and brogued. Stout crepe rubber often takes the place of leather soles for such shoes. (The nap of a soft leather should never be raised with a wire brush but, if worn shiny, petrol or benzine may be used with care and the shoe finished off with the correct colour cleaning ball).

Monk

Monk

A popular shoe for informal wear. The one depicted is made of Russia Calf but, as Monk Shoes are designed above all for ease and comfort, Buckskin is often chosen. Furthermore, an easier fitting is given around the ankle with a shoe fastened by a single buckle, as in Monk, than in a lace-up shoe where a closer fit is desirable. Although the true Monk, with its pleasing simplicity of style, is a plain shoe, broguing can be carried out if desired.

Brogue Monk

Brogue Monk

This is a variant of the plain Monk shoe that has been used for informal wear for many years. Different styles of broguing may be carried out but the wing-cap is found to be particularly suited to the long-fronted Monk style. The shoe photographed is made of Crup or Cordovan leather, rich dark brown in colour, and has a thick crepe rubber sole. If a lighter-weight shoe is desired, microcellular rubber soling equally thick but not as heavy as crepe, can be substituted.

The shoe tree shown is specially hollowed for air-travel.

This shoe was styled by John Lobb, 47 Faubourg St. Honore, Paris

Norwegian Monk

Norwegian Monk

A new variety of the well-known Monk shoe, that has been designed to combine strength with neatness. Stout Bordeaux Calf has been used for the uppers and this balanced with with a fairly thick leather sole for country wear, Metal toe pieces and heel tips can be included, if desired, as can been seen in the photograph.

Three-piece shoe trees are recommended to remove the creasing which, to some extent, is unavoidable in a plain-fronted shoe.

This shoe was styled by John Lobb, 47 Faubourg St.Honore, Paris.

Kangaroo Laceless

Kangaroo Laceless

Designed to meet this demand to combine smartness with ease. Having no laces to tie, it can easily be put on standing up, with along shoe horn.* Useful for indoor or outdoor wear it is made in full-brogue, half-brogue or plain styles. The elastic may be hidden by a leather covering if wished.
Kangaroo is a most exclusive leather of glove-like suppleness, yet tough and durable. It has an attractive small grain and takes a high polish easily.

* Supplied in Long-Horn, 20″ long, approximately.

Perforated Oxford Shoe

Perforated Oxford

Designed for coolness and comfort, this shoe has been made of light weight Box Calf and the perforations carried through both upper and lining. Brown or black calf or any light leather can be equally well used.

To maintain the best appearance, trees should always be used and the hollow-hinged type is suggested as being particularly suitable for this light-weight shoe.

Military Pattern

Military Pattern

Whilst variations from this style are often wore by officers, the regulation toe-cap with two rows of stitches, together with the Derby front, make it the safest choice for uniform. For civilian wear the shoe is admirable for all country purposes or for motoring and general travel.
Made of Brown Grain Calf, it combines strength and durability with great comfort.

The hollow one-piece tree, hinged or at the waist, is useful for stout shoes of this description as it adds but little weight to what is already a fairly heavy shoe. If the shoe becomes really wet, however, a solid three-piece tree is preferable.

Shooting

Shooting

A plain Derby shoe made of heavy Grained Hide (black); this is a greasy leather which will not polish but is idea for really rough wear. Extra strength could be given by broguing but, owing to the thickness of the leather, this is not usually advised. If long grass has to be reckoned with, a boot cut on similar lines and with a fairly high leg would be recommended.

The hollow one-piece tree, hinged at the waist is useful for stout shoes of this description as it adds but little weight to what is already a heavy shoe. If the shoe becomes really wet, however, a solid three-piece tree is advisable

Full Brogue Derby

Full Brogue Derby

The classic lines of this shoe have been carried out in Brown Grain Calf. Made of this leather, and with a properly metal-studded or rubber-treaded sole, it is unexcelled as a heavy golfing shoe, the full broguing giving extra strength to withstand the twisting and turning imposed by the game. As will be seen at a glance, the dignified proportions of this shoe make it a certain choice also for smart country or sports wear.

The three-piece tree is completely fills the shoe, giving maximum support to all parts and thus assisting cleaning. Note the handle to the key-piece by which the shoe is held for polishing. This solid tree is the one recommended above all others for preserving the shape and life of the shoe.

Norwegian

Norwegian

Brown Grain Calf is used for this shoe, which is excellent for either golf or country wear. The Norwegian is a waterproof as a leather shoe can be and this is due to certain essential and unique features. There are only two vertical seams in the uppers; one of these appears at the toe, under which a stout “toe box” made of hard leather gives great protection, and the other, slightly curved, can be seen on the inside of the heel. The shoe has been photographed on the inside to show this latter seam, which is purposely not placed symmetrically at the back, where the greatest strain occurs, but at the inside where it is much stronger and less noticeable; the stitches of both these seams are made from within through half the thickness of the leather only and are therefore invisible. The sole, too, is fixed to the uppers differently from any other type of shoe. Instead of using a welt, the upper is turned outwards and stitched to the sole and this operation necessitates an extra row of stitches just above the sole, which can be seen in the photograph. The characteristic Norwegian pattern, i.e., the crescent-shaped piece of leather on the front, is today commonly used for ordinary walking shoes but the features described above, essential to the true Norwegian, are seldom to be found in any but the best quality hand-made shoes.

Ostrich Norwegian

Ostrich Norwegian

The unusual marking of this rare brown leather merits attention. The style of the slipper is well known but the Ostrich leather being both good-looking and strong, makes it suitable for indoor and outdoor wear. It is one of the most expensive of leathers and is attracting the attention of the connoisseur more and more. This style is usually made for men but may also be made for ladies.

Tuxedo Slipper

Tuxedo Slipper

Made in black doeskin, the Norwegian lake and cross-strap are picked out in white stitching. This slipper can be worn with effect with the modern dinner jacket or for any indoor wear. Dark blue or brown Doeskin is sometimes preferred.

The black polished hollow-hinged trees are very smart, particularly if brass plates, engraved with the owners name are added.

Albert

Albert

Against the background of dark blue-black velvet the gold-embroidered Naval badge shows to great advantage. As an alternative, worn with smoking jacket, the wearer’s monogram can replace the badge if desired. Mainly for men, they are nevertheless often chosen by ladies and can be made in velvet of many colours.

Jodhpur

Jodhpur

This style, designed many years ago by JOHN LOBB for the late ruler of the state whose name it bears, differs from the “Jodhpore” of general manufacture in its method of fastening, laces being used instead of ankle straps. In practice this gives a neat fitting round the ankle, the trouser is enabled to drop closely over the top of the boot and there are no straps or buckles to interfere with the stirrup leather. Great distinction is leant to this smart but comfortable riding boot when made of highly polished Russia Calf, as in the photograph (Willow or Analine Calf is used these days).

The compact three-piece tree can be made solid or hollowed as desired.

Norwegian Boot

Norwegian Boot

Designed for hard service, this boot is made with the “Norwegian welt” for waterproofing; the uppers, instead of being turned inwards as with an ordinary welt, are turned out and held fast by the extra row of stitches seen in the photograph. This characteristic of the correctly made Norwegian boot or shoe is seldom to be found today in any but the finest quality hand-made work.

The boot depicted is of unique construction; the forepart is made of a pliable Brown Calf and the back portion is of firm Grained Hide. The advantage of this is that the extra support is given to the ankle and instep whereas the toes are given all possible freedom by the flexible forepart. On a long march the feet derive great benefit from this support and flexibility in the correct places. The soles can be studded or not as required

The three-piece is usually made hollow for traveling and is unpolished to prevent sticking if made wet. The handle can be omitted if too bulky but is very useful for holding the boot when being cleaned.

Ski Boot

Ski Boot

Made of waterproof Beva leather, this boot has been evolved after considerable experiment, and incorporates the best principles of the French and Swiss designs. The instep strapping built inside the boot of thin leather, fastened with flat laces, gives support and rigidity. The ankle strap passes through a guide to give firmness. The snow shield which closes under the laces ensures the front is waterproof. A rubber-padded collar gives comfort round the ankle. Narrow, compact soles ensure greater control and simplicity of fitting to the skis, and the Norwegian welts offer strength and waterproofing. Since this was designed modifications have taken place in ski boots and all-leather boots are not normally worn; therefore this picture is mainly of historical interest.

The boots are equally effective with the French ” Longue Laniere ” binding or the ” Khandahar ” as depicted. It is believed to be the only bespoke Hand-Made Ski Boot obtainable in England.

Polo

Polo

The graceful lines of this long boot are achieved first, by the straightness of back from calf to heel and secondly, by the sweeping curve of the front from the top of the boot to the instep. Viewed from the side when the wearer is mounted, these features show to great advantage. The boot is of Russia Calf and is much favoured for general hacking as well as for polo. Made of Waxed Calf or Box Calf it becomes a black riding boot, useful for all purposes.

The tree is of the usual four-piece type and can be made hollow or solid as desired.

Greenly

Greenly

Previously used almost exclusively by the Royal Artillery, this boot was made for many other regiments when war broke out in 1939. The three straps fasten the leg over a folded “bellows” tongue, a piece of whalebone being sewn into the front of the boot to prevent gaping. These straps, together with the laced throat, enable the boot to be put on or taken off quickly and easily. For the man with a large calf its advantages are obvious. As the boot may be used for marching the sole is made slightly curved from the back to front to give increased comfort on long marches. For the civilian it makes a workmanlike field boot for either riding or walking. Brown Grain Calf is the leather used which, although slightly greasy, will take a high polish.

For active service the four-piece tree is invariably hollowed and the wood left unvarnished. For the boots likely to be subjected to much wet, varnished wood is not used as it may become stuck to the leather.